WordPress 2.0 is in beta!!! download it now!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Picked at random from the ‘WordPress 2.0 is in beta!!!!’ posts:

Just one thing I didn’t like and lot of others from my discussions with them is the bundling of Akismet with this release.
The plugin does work but you need a WordPress.com API Key, which means you need a WordPress.com account, which means lot of dead signups at WP.com just for the API key, because all users won’t really be bothering to use their WP.com accounts!
Well, it’s the developers choice I guess😦

This is totally unsurprising.

I’m going to explain one more time about Akismet, for the benefit of anyone who hasn’t already been subjected to my livejournal rantings.

There is no such thing as a dead sign-up. OK, if you are looking to create a thriving and vibrant blog community there patently is such a thing as a dead sign-up, because 90% of your site being single entry ‘Hello world!’ googleclutter doesn’t make for a thriving and vibrant community, plus of course there are the namespace issues (people get surprisingly narked about their desired usernames being snaffled by people who never bother to use them.) A lot of us have this primitive sense that these unblogs are, somehow, wasting space that could be better used. I know, I know. Disk space is cheap, and they don’t even exist until we (or, more likely, Google) call upon the idle database to generate them. I said it was primitive.

However, if you are looking to get mentioned in every article about blogging /sell a lot of advertising /get bought by Yahoo!, what matters is the number of accounts you can claim, not the number of active users. In the same way, if you have a deal with Flock to push people their way in return for them pushing them yours, it doesn’t matter whether they ever use Flock again; it still gets counted as a download, and it still looks good when they tell the investors about it, and everyone gets to blow the Web 2.0 bubble that little bit bigger.

The other nice thing about inactive users is that they bump up your figures and boost your pagerank while putting next to no burden on the server. They don’t drain your resources the way high-traffic sites are wont to do.

I’ve always liked the way livejournal distinguishes between active and inactive users. They can afford to do so because they actually are a thriving and vibrant blog community that has been going for years. WordPress.com, on the other hand, is a newcomer that can’t, as yet, make any such claims (and, if the feeds on the Dashboard are anything to go by, won’t be able to for a while) so they have to rely on other ways to attract sign-ups and investors. There will be no differentiation here between active and inactive, depend upon it.

In conclusion, it looks like Matt may finally have got the hang of marketing. Even though calling the new release 2.0 is sort of wanky, like ‘yes we are jumping on the Web 2.0 bandwagon but we are doing so in a knowing and ever-so-slightly ironic way so you mustn’t take it too seriously. It’s only a release number. lol.’

(No, I can’t explain how I’m getting all that from a release number. It’s nuance, OK?)

3 Comments »

  1. Matt said

    You lose points for the Web 2.0 conspiracy rant but otherwise the blog is funny enough, subscribed.

  2. Hey ! great blog !

    also i cannot spell ‘marketing’! how much of a moron spammer am I?

    greets

  3. Vc said

    I’d almost assume you were whooami in another guise….

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