actions speak louder

[claims victory]

[admits yeah, ok, it wasn’t her, it was techcrunch, but hey, still victory]

[notes presence of wordpress.org/extend/themes and absence of themes.wordpress.net]

[thinks it is probably safe, after six weeks of inactivity, to declare the latter dead.]

[will just plug the idea one last time, so Matt can claim it was a democratic decision by the community rather than because he was fed up of getting called a hypocrite.]

[goes to bed]

16 Comments »

  1. [notes the absence of WordPress Kvetch.]

  2. It was discussed at WordCamp in the “Developer Duke-Out” session. Matt posed the question to Donncha, me, Andy and Mike. I suggested that we could move the developer credits to the back end where they wouldn’t influence search engines, and Matt was receptive to that. So while the TC thing may have surfaced the issue again, it shouldn’t get all the credit. So go ahead and claim victory.🙂

  3. Kissing Bandit said

    I find this pretty funny considering that when this issue was raised in another ticket, Matt shot it down with “Not particularly inclined”. I guess users smacking him (and WP) upside the head with it changed his inclinations in a hurry.
    -KB

  4. Root said

    You know – I have to hand it to Mark as not only a geeks’ geek but a people manager. A nice guy and a leader amongst men. And wimmin.🙂

  5. Owen said

    When the link requested – one that points to the list of complete people who’s working sweat and ill-recognized open source contributions power that which now pays for Automattic – appears in the blogroll, then you can claim victory.

  6. Picture Improvement said

    @Mark: the petulant commit message suggests that “attacks” from TechCrunch, Wank et al were the primary motivation, and that he still doesn’t think the criticism is warranted. The change was made for practicality, not ethics.

    It’s a hollow kind of victory.

  7. Pedant said

    @Owen – that would be a very long list. It would be a contentious list (“I said it should happen, I didn’t code it but it did happen therefore I claim victory and I demand my absolute right to be included in the core code / credit list”) and that’s just plain stupid. By that measure wank would want demand her rightful place. I would hope even she would see that is a joke.

    Want proof this will happen? Go look at the Copyright Holders page on Codex. There are people there who have no right to be.

    Also you would want core coders. Not themers, not helpers, not installers, not plugin authors. Just coders. And just coders would not have got WordPress to where it is – it took a community to get it there and if you are going to cry about people who have worked then you had better be prepared for an amazing list. You can moan about the few that were there before the above trac change but they were fundamental to the very first code.

    If Habari lasts as long I look forward to a distorted default theme with a distortingly long blogroll. Unless the meritocracy decide to limit it for the sake of aesthetics of course. I trust that Habari has no links at all anywhere – I must check. You aren’t being the pot here are you?

  8. alex said

    To the author of the original post – get a life.

    I love WordPress and I think that default links pointing to WordPress authors (the links which get deleted in 99% of all WP installations) are totally justified. Yes, Matt changed them to shut idiots like you, but it does not mean that original links were wrong. In your open-source-induced rage you forgot that linked people are in fact contributing huge chunk of WordPress code.

  9. @Owen: you have a point. But we should probably just count ourselves lucky he didn’t shoehorn a link to Automattic in there.🙂 It really isn’t in his financial interests to draw attention to the fact that WordPress development != Automattic.

    @PI: yes, it is hollow, since of course the other reason he’s doing this is to make it easier to justify excluding any themes with vanity links from wordpress.org. Now the line is not just that linkbacks are evil unless they are to the developers, it is that linkbacks are evil full stop. Sometimes you have to make personal sacrifices in order to achieve the greater goal.

    @alex: hello Mr King, sorry about all that TLA revenue you’re losing but I did suggest setting up a donation fund to recompense you. Are you aware that Akismet thinks you’re spam?😀

  10. Root said

    Matt has done the Google numbers. He can survive without the link now.

  11. Kissing Bandit said

    Just caught Matt’s recent post and I couldn’t help but raise an eyebrow when I read the following:

    …giving your users something they want and provides value rather than something they never asked for…

    Swiftly followed by:

    The developer blogroll links in WordPress are nothing like the links being bought and sold for the intention of spamming search engines…

    I posits the question: What value, exactly, does the developer links provide the end user with and which end users requested them? (And by “end user”, I mean 98% of the WP user base who don’t understand what the words “core”, “code”, or “PHP” mean.) Surely not the information they need to get started using and learning about WordPress. Seems those links only benefited the developers who were lucky enough to be there and when the end users wanted them removed, they were shot down.

    Although the links weren’t “as bad” — and by “bad”, I assume he means “bad neighbourhood” as defined by Google — as some of the links being sold in themes or in the footers of forum software, they still served the same purpose of search engine gaming and enjoyed the same ill-gotten gains. The only difference? The owners of those “bad” links had to pay cold hard cash for the privilege of PR-goodness and search engine rankings.

    Still, I’m very glad to see the change. It’s the way it should have been in the first place.

    @alex: You’d do well to take your own advice. If you believe that 99% of people remove them, I question just how open your eyes really are. Of all the people who I’ve helped with WordPress, roughly 60% didn’t know how to remove them and they ended up staying on their live sites for sometimes months (plural).

    -KB

  12. drmike said

    Hey Wank. Catch this one?

    Link

  13. […] Nice job guys and gals! […]

  14. Well, a good news anyway. Probably I’m too greedy, if we can stop reading whether somebody loves their iPod or not in WP Dashboard……

  15. Root said

    yeah alex made out like a bandit by driving traffic to his commercial site with his style comps. To keep the traffic flowing he even hosted borked layouts for months after everyone knew they sucked. Get a life? Drop dead.

  16. @abel-
    the wordpress planet stuff can at least be filtered in 2.3 (or unfiltered😉 )

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